Word of the Day: Father

Father/fa-ther/fä-thər
Noun:  (In Christian belief) the first person of the Trinity; God
Father! – to God himself we cannot give a holier name.”
William Wordsworth, 1770 – 1850
Noun:  (often as a title or form of address) a priest
In the days of my youth, Father William replied, 
I remember’d that youth could not last; 
I thought of the future, whatever I did, 
That I never might grieve for the past.”
From The Old Man’s Comforts by Robert Southey, 1774 – 1843
Noun: a man in relation to his natural child or children
“It is much easier to become a father than to be one.”
Kent Nerburn, 1946 –
Noun: a man who gives care and protection to someone or something
“One father is more than a hundred schoolmasters.” 
George Herbert, 1593 – 1633
Noun: an important figure in the origin and early history of something
Galileo Galilei, 1561 – 1642
Verb: be the father of; bring into the world
“Millions of men are believed to carry a string of DNA bequeathed to them by Genghis Khan, the Mongolian conqueror who reputedly fathered hundreds of children.”
Verb: be the source or originator of
“Far from the truth lay the antique assumption that man had fathered the weapon. The weapon, instead, had fathered man.”
Robert Ardrey, 1908 – 1980
verb:  treat with protective care
Fathered he is, and yet he’s fatherless.” 
From Macbeth by William Shakespeare, 1564 – 1616